Author Topic: Gear & YOU: Working Towards A Better Future (TM)  (Read 26291 times)

Offline HavHav

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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2006, 07:07:57 PM »
If you guys feel like being liable for any medical treatment you give, go ahead. But my personal deal is only do what you are QUALIFIED to. I carry band-aids, advil, tylenol, electrolites, some neosporin, and a few bandages. Sure I 'know' how to shove a tube down someones throat, but does that make me qualified?

Not to stray too far off topic, but you guys have put a great deal of time into these posts, and they are some excellent reading material.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by HavHav »

Offline KOBO

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« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2006, 12:02:51 PM »
As far as first aid kits go it is good to have the stuff for the lighter cuts and so on. I would add to carry some wraps, if you have spare room to house it. Hopefully we never need anything to do open surgery on the field, but what I see has good potential other then getting scratched up by the brush is rolling your ankle or sprains. With the terain and fast pace action it is easy to loose your footing or trip and fall. Wraps can imobilize your ankle or what not for us to get anyone back to the cars. And in severe case where something may be broken a wrap can be used to tie of splints. Another good tool is the comb! I am sure alot of you have seen the comb I keep on my rig to keep my goatee clean, but it is great for pulling cacti out of your legs.

Great write up on the gear for the field, unfortanatly I am one who carries way to much.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by KOBO »

Offline Ghostsequel

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« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2006, 12:26:35 PM »
Quote from: "Vince"
A note re medical kits :

We don't have anyone qualified to render medical aid who plays with any regularity, so, anything over bandaids, rubbing alcohol, electrolytes, and gauze is unnecessary and maybe dangerous. Snakebite kits have largely fallen out of vogue because if used incorrectly could probably dick up the person trying to use it and to boot, not have a beneficial effect on the afflicted person.


I'm a registered EMT-B, and am qualified to do all kinds of things like setting up IVs (though not administering them), C-Spine precautions, administering activated charcoal, treating gunshot wounds, inserting OPAs and NPAs, working AEDs, etc.  The thing is that for airsoft med kits, I don't need anything other than basic first aid stuff.  Gauze, rubbing alcohol, maybe some charcoal in case anyone swallows something really harmful (poisonous plants, for example), etc.  A protective barrier for CPR (though I doubt it'd ever be used, it takes up extremely little space).  And a few pairs of exam gloves for BSI reasons.

HavHav, you have a good point about liability; only do what you're qualified for.  I could probably intubate a person if I need to, insert an IV, all that good stuff, but I'm not qualified.  Unless it's a life or death thing, I'm not doing it.  The nice thing is the Good Samaritan laws protect those who render medical treatment and are not doing so in the course of their job.  Not that I'd want to rely on that, given the way our sue-happy legal system runs, but at least it's there.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Ghostsequel »

Offline Vince

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« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2006, 12:30:42 PM »
You quoted me, so, I know you read my post -- I said with regularity..I haven't seen you at many games. I believe Benn Psalms also carries a certification or two, but he's in the same boat with you.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Vince »


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Offline Ghostsequel

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« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2006, 12:49:49 PM »
Quote from: "Vince"
You quoted me, so, I know you read my post -- I said with regularity..I haven't seen you at many games. I believe Benn Psalms also carries a certification or two, but he's in the same boat with you.


No, I know what you mean, man.  And no, I don't play AA games regularly, though I would friggin love to and have a blast when I get to them  8) .  My purpose in quoting you was more to talk about the necessity and use of items in a med kit, not how often I play.  Regardless of what medical stuff I'm qualified to do, I only really need basic first aid stuff.  Hell, I could deliver a baby, but I'm damn sure not going to carry the necessary equipment with me to airsoft.

Also just pointing out some other great and simple things to have in a kit, like the CPR barrier and gloves.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Ghostsequel »

Offline TimW

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« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2006, 11:19:00 PM »
Unfortunately, I haven't (and therefore, don't) play airsoft. So all my stuff deals with real guns and real bullets.

In my line of work, I have the distinct advantage of being able to try a LOT of stuff.  There are quite a few righs out there I like, some I don't dislike and others I hate.

IMO, it comes down to WHY you're using it.

For example, I have run a couple of shootnig matches.  There, I use the PHUTV from Eagle...a nice small chest rig that carries more than enough mags and some pistol mags, too.  A dump pouch on my belt and I am set.

If I am out doing search and rescue, I'll use my Warlord with my Glock secured inside it, out of the way and unobtrusive.  With a big enough pack, I might end up carrying an SBR since some of the stuff is down in the brush, near the border.

If camping/hiking/putzing around, I might use my MESA vest. On it I will be attaching 2 cool 4-mag shingles Ganef made up for me. So I"ll have 8 mags + one in the gun.  More than I can imagine needing.  Plus it hold a hydration pack and I can wear a backpack over it.

If I think I am going to be someplace that might actually turn into a two-way range, I'll wear something like the Eagle LEO armor carrier or a CIRAS (since I now carry the kevlar panels for them...).  This go-to-war rig would be the last thing I'd want to wear, since with armor and plates it weighs 23 pounds before I attach anything else. Ugh.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by TimW »
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Offline Farslayer

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« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2006, 11:26:38 PM »
Tim,
You should post pictures of this stuff.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Farslayer »
Benn

Offline Wicked-Mpact

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« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2006, 12:30:49 AM »
As far as medical kits goes, I pretty much have the same mentioned above. Been to lots of games and OPs and this is what was actually used.

Cleaning Pads/Band-Aids
- Used a few times but recently when a player was injured but bleeding a lot from a minor laceration, questionable environment was cause for immediate attention.
Gauze/wrap
- Operation Restore order, teammate was patched up (not by me) from a bad cut on his hand from broken glass in a window.
Bee Sting Ointment
- OP Serpent Hammer our squad was attacked by dozens of bees/hornets
Advil/ ibuprofen
- Very Important!
Tweezers
- Splinters are common
Chapstick
- Didn't have it at the time but it seriously affected a team member’s ability, rendering pretty much in-operable :D

For the most part when dealing with my own blood a CLEAN death rag comes in handy this is why I wash mines now
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Wicked-Mpact »

Offline Kurn

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« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2006, 01:37:09 AM »
I'll post my load out tomorrow, but for now I wanted to post my thoughts on the medical kit subject.

I have no medical knowledge what so ever, so I carry a very small first aid kit on me (band-aids, allergy pills).  I keep a few more things in my car, but I figure if I or someone else gets seriously hurt the best thing to do would be to get them to the closest hospital as soon as possible.

Oddly enough, I have hurt myself more in the staging area, or on the way there, then I have during an actual game.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Kurn »
Not dead yet.

Offline Firehead

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« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2006, 04:21:15 AM »
I am CLS certified, Vince, and I'd consider myself a regular(except for lately). I carry Epipen, along with IV fluid, and a few other drugs in my CLS bag.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Firehead »

Offline Bullseye

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« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2006, 08:05:45 AM »
Basically the rules are (or should be):
1) Take nothing you aren't trained to do (I'm an ex-EMT/A with over 2 years exp working for an Ambulance service, plus formerly certified as an ARC Adv. First Aid Instructor, BTW FWIW). Band-Aids, tweezers, analgesics, etc are all fine.

2) As long as you act within your level of training, the states Good Samaritan Act covers you legally from lawsuit. So far, no one has been sucessfully sued if they stayed within their training limits....

3) Unless you contract and PAY someone to provide Emergency Care at an event, expect NO assistance except for Buddy- or Self- care but be thankful for what you get  ;)

A Tip: Carry Pepcid. One, it can cut the upper GI distress if you take Ibuprofen in quantity. Two A single Pepcid, followed by two Benedryl works wonders for severe allergic reactions. Pepcid amplifies the effect of Benedryl by up to FOUR TIMES. I had a severe case of hives a couple years ago when my stepfather-in-law died suddenly - this is what ER's do (except in IV format). Not quite as fast as an EpiPen, but....
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Bullseye »
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Offline Raith

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« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2007, 08:27:34 PM »
I've made this a sticky.  I think theres a lot of people who didn't catch this the first time around.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Raith »
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Offline Raith

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« Reply #27 on: June 22, 2007, 12:52:47 PM »
I've updated my original post to include some more recent examples as well as make some things more easily read.  (The gist is the same)

Additional things that do not fit into the original article -

Boots
Gloves
Kneepads

Boots should be pretty obvious.  Most good ones are made out of leather and cordura or the like and they're thick enough to shrug off most thorns and other pokies you'll find.

Gloves and kneepads are something that I've always worn when playing airsoft and I can't see myself doing so without them.

I have what I think are the nicest gloves out there.  They're expensive for gloves, but they work great for me.  I haven't had any kind of problems with them since I've had them and though I'm a bit less dexterous than I would be without them, I feel that the trade off is quite worth it.  If your gloves get torn up, at least its them rather than your hands.  The ability to touch/interact with pokey, hot, dirty, or stuff that would otherwise hurt your hands is invaluable.  Crossing a fence, getting in a vehicle, etc. make it worth having nice gloves, I think.

I consider kneepads to be essential as well.  The one or two times I've not worn them, I've regretted it, even in a short game.  Aside from the usual cactus/pokey protection, they allow you to somewhat comfortably take a knee or monica position for an extended period of time.

I'm not too keen on elbow pads.  I'm sure they have place, and getting your elbows messed up does suck, but for me, they've only really been in the way.

----

Also, here is a list of specifically what I use now and some comments on them -

Eyewear -
Oakley SI M Frame 2.0
Bolle T-800 Goggles

While I don't wish to discuss sealed vs non sealed eyewear here, I will talk about glasses.  I feel that the Oakley M Frame and M Frame 2.0s that I wear now provide an adequate degree of protection for me.  When you get down to it, everything is a compromise and everything in what we do is a calculated risk.  This is no different.  I've had fogging problems before and one of my solutions to that has been the Oakley M Frame.  I take the responsibility of knowing that I have the perhaps slightly reduced protection of glasses to have the greater visibility that they afford me.  End of story on that one.

The Bolle T-800s are my current favorite goggle.  I've had none of the same fogging issues that I've had with other goggles, including the ESS Turbofans.  Not really too much else to be said about them.

Undershirt -
PolarMAX All Year Undergear T-Shirt

I've had these for a couple of years now and they're starting to pill and I think their wicking effectiveness has been reduced.  I plan to replace them with some 5.11 or Zensah undershirts.

Load Carriage -

Coyote Tactical Mesh Chest Rig
Coyote Tactical Kydex Single M4 Magazine Pouch (x2)
Coyote Tactical Dual M4 Magazine Pouch (x3)
Coyote Tactical Mockingbird ICOM F4S Radio Pouch (x2)
Coyote Tactical Chuckwalla Utility Pouch

Most of the commentary I have on these items can be found in the initial post in this thread.

Hydration -
Camelbak 3L Thermobak Omega

Its simple, compact and does the job I want it to.  An added bonus is that because of how the zipper is, I can route the drink tube under my arm, rather than over my shoulder.  I prefer this way, as it ends with the drink tube pointing up at your head, rather than down at your feet.

Gloves -
Southwest Motorsports Digital Friction Fighter NT Gloves

The gloves I mention above are these.  They're definately some of the more expensive gloves out there, but I feel they are the best for me.  Before these, I used Hatch Operator gloves.  I really like the Hatch Operators, but the SWMS Friction Fighters blow them out of the water.  They are less dexterous, but far, far more stout.  With Southwest Motorsports' absorption into Camelbak, I think the availability of these has been reduced and the cost has likely increased, but I'm not sure.

Kneepads -
Alta Industries Superflex Knee Pads w/Altalok Buckle

The final word in kneepads.  They look the same as the Hatch, Blackhawk, etc ones, but they are much, much nicer.  Unlike some of the others, they stay where you put them and don't bite into your legs.  $5-10 more than other brands, but in my opinion definately worth it.

Socks -
Thorlo Combat Boot Sock

These socks are the best I've found, though I've not looked very hard for socks. :P  Nice and thick where it seems to matter, they've not given me a problem.  They're expensive for socks, but I've had the same ones for a long time now.

Boots -
Wellco Value Cool Lite Infantry Combat Boots (VCL ICB)

I've not had any problems with these boots in the nearly 5 years I've used them.  Since I really only use them for airsoft and the occasional hike, they've held up just fine.  I think that the quality of Wellco materials and workmanship has declined since I purchased these, so I don't think I'd buy the same thing again when I finally do need new boots.

----

I hope to continue to expand this thread with pertinent information.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Raith »
Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.


Offline djmtott

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« Reply #28 on: June 22, 2007, 01:52:20 PM »
Good stuff, and I agree 100% about the kneepads. I bought mine before my first game, and I'll never go without them.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by djmtott »
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Offline TimW

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« Reply #29 on: June 22, 2007, 02:14:31 PM »
Quote from: "Raith"
Socks -
Thorlo Combat Boot Sock

These socks are the best I've found, though I've not looked very hard for socks. :P  Nice and thick where it seems to matter, they've not given me a problem.  They're expensive for socks, but I've had the same ones for a long time now.


That's what that smell is.  Perhaps we can take up a collection so you can get a second pair of socks. :D

As for the SWMS gloves, I am a camelbak dealer.  If anyone is SERIOUS about wanting some, I will gladly make inquiry into pricing and availability.  You won't pay retail, but I can't guarantee you a price at this juncture.

Finally, nice list and comments...where did you purchase the socks?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by TimW »
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